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Cybersecurity Collaboration

Establishing a security Community of Interest


Hivint is all about security collaboration.

We believe that organisations can’t afford to solve security problems on their own and need to more efficiently build and consume security resources and services. Whilst we see our Security Colony as a key piece to this collaboration puzzle, we definitely don’t see it as the only piece.

Through our advisory services, we regularly see the same challenges and problems being faced by organisations within the same industry. We also see hesitation between organisations to share information with others. This is often due to perceived competitiveness, lack of a framework to enforce sharing and fear of sharing too much information, along with privacy concerns.

We believe that it is important for organisations to realise that security shouldn’t compete between ‘competitors’, but instead against threats, and that working together to solve common security challenges is vital. We want to help make that happen. One such way — and the purpose of this article — is for a group of similar organisations to form a security Community of Interest (CoI).

This article outlines our suggested approach towards establishing and running a CoI, covering off a number of common concerns regarding the operation of such a community, and concludes with a link to a template that can be used by any organisation wishing to establish such a CoI.

Why is information sharing good?

Security information sharing and collaboration helps ensure that organisations across the industry learn from each other, leading to innovative thinking to deter cyber criminals. Our earlier blog post, Security Collaboration — The Problem and Our Solution, provides a detailed outlook on security collaboration.

We consider security collaboration as vital to making a difference to the economics of cyber-crimes, and as such we share what works and what doesn’t by making the output of our consulting engagements available on our Security Colony Portal.

However, we acknowledge that there are times when sharing could be more direct between organisations by forming a collective more closely — documents and resources could then be shared that are more specific to their industry (for example, acceptable use policies may be very similar across universities), or more sensitive in nature in a way that could make it unreasonable to share publicly (for example, sharing security related issues that may not have been effectively solved yet).

When does a Community of Interest work?

Sharing of information is most effective when a collective group is interested in a similar type of information. An example of this may be university institutions — while distinct entities will have different implementations, the overall challenges that each face is likely to be similar. Pooling resources such as policy, operating procedures, and to an extent metrics, provides a way to maximise performance of the group as a whole, while minimising duplication of effort.

When is Community of Interest sharing a bad idea?

Sharing agreements like a CoI will not be effective in all circumstances — a CoI will only work if information flows in both directions for the organisations involved. It would not be a suitable framework for things that generally flow in a single direction, such as government reporting. A CoI’s primary focus should also not be on sharing ‘threat intel’ as there are a number of services that already do this such as Cert Australia, Open Threat Exchange, McAfee Threat Intelligence Exchange and IBM X-Force to name a few.

How is information shared within a Community of Interest?

An important aspect of a CoI is the platform used for sharing between members of CoI. It is important to recognise the fact that platforms used will not be the same used across all CoI’s, each organisation will have unique requirements and preferences as to which platforms will be most effective in the circumstances. Platforms such as email-lists and portals can be effective for sharing electronically, however platforms like meetings (be it in person, or teleconference style) may be more effective in some cases.

What kind of information can be shared?

In theory, almost anything, however in practice there are seven major types of cybersecurity information suitable for sharing, according to Microsoft[1]. These are:

  • Details of attempted or successful incidents
  • Potential threats to business
  • Exploitable software
  • Hardware or business process vulnerabilities
  • Mitigations strategies against identified threats and vulnerabilities
  • Situational awareness
  • Best practices for incident management and strategic analysis of current and future risk environment.

Hivint recognises that every piece of information has different uses and benefits. Sharing of information like general policy documents, acceptable use policy, or processes that an organisation struggles with or perform well can uplift cyber resilience and efficiency among businesses. These are also relatively simple artefacts that can be shared to help build an initial trust in the CoI, and are recommended as a starting point.

What about privacy and confidentiality?

Keeping information confidential is a fundamental value for establishing trust within a CoI. To ensure this is maintained, guidelines must be established against sharing of customer information or personal records.

Information should be de-identified and de-sensitised to remove any content that could potentially introduce a form of unauthorised disclosure / breach, and limitations should be established to determine the extent of information able to be shared, as well as the authorised use of this information by the receiving parties.

How is a Community of Interest formed?

It is important to realise that organisations need not follow a single structure or model when setting up a CoI. Ideally, the first step is identifying and contacting like-minded people with an interest in collaborating from your network or business area. Interpersonal relationship between personnel involved in CoI is critical to retaining and enhancing the trust and confidence of all members. A fitting approach to creating such an environment is by initially exchanging non-specific or non-critical information on a more informal basis. Considering that sharing agreements like this require a progressive approach, it is best not to jump head first by sharing all the information pertaining to your business at the first instance.

Upon success of the first phase of sharing and development of a strong relationship between parties involved, a more formal approach is encouraged for the next phase.

Next Steps

We’ve made a Cyber Security Collaboration Framework available to all subscribers (free and paid) of Security Colony which can be used as a template to start the discussion with interested parties, and when the time comes, formally establish the CoI.

[1] ‘A Framework for Cybersecurity information sharing and risk reduction’ — https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=45516


Additional Information

There are a number of instances where cyber-security information sharing arrangements have been established around the world. The below provides links to a small number of these.

http://data.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/data/information-management/info-sharing-framework/cambs-information-sharing-framework.pdf

https://corpgov.law.harvard.edu/2016/03/03/federal-guidance-on-the-cybersecurity-information-sharing-act-of-2015/

https://www.enisa.europa.eu/publications/cybersecurity-information-sharing

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