[email protected]   +1 (833) 3COLONY / +61 1300 733 940

Maturing Organisational Security and Security Service Catalogues


One of the key objectives for an information security professional is providing assurance that the systems which are implemented, or are soon to be implemented, are secure. A large part of this involves engaging with business and project teams proactively to ensure that security needs are met, while trying hard not to interfere with on-time project delivery.

Unfortunately, we’re not very good at it.

Recently, having agreed to conduct a security risk assessment (SRA) of a client’s SFTP solution, which they intended to use to transfer files to a vendor in place of their existing process of emailing the files, I sat down to discuss the security requirement with the Solution Designer, only to have him tell me that an SRA had been done before. Not just on the same design pattern, but on the exact same SFTP solution. They were simply adding an additional existing vendor to the solution to improve the security of their inter-company file transfer process. The organisation didn’t know how to go about evaluating the risks to the company of this change, so they used the ‘best fit’ security-related process available to it, which just happened to be an SRA.

Granted, in the example above, a new vendor might need to be assessed for the operational risk associated with them uploading files to our client’s environment, or if there were changes to the SFTP solution configuration. But in this case, the vendor had been working with them for some time so there was no further risk introduced, just a more secure business process: the risk was getting lower not higher.

While this is only one example, this scenario is not uncommon across many organisations we work with, across many industry sectors, and it’s only going to get harder. With more organisations moving to an agile development methodology and cloud deployments, ensuring security keeps up with new developments throughout the business is going to be critical to maintaining at least a modicum of security in these businesses.

So, if you’re getting asked to perform a risk assessment the day before go-live (yes, this still happens), you’re doing it wrong.

If you’re routinely performing your assessments of systems and technology within the project lifecycle, you’re doing it wrong.

If you’re engaging with your project teams with policy statements and standards documents, yes, unfortunately you’re also doing it wrong.

Projects are where things — often big things — change in an organisation’s business or technology environment. And where there is change, there is generally a key touch point for the security team. Projects will generally introduce the biggest potential vulnerabilities to your environment, but if there is an opportunity to positively influence the security outcomes at your organisation, it will also be as part of a project.

Once a system is in, it’s too late. If you haven’t already given your input to get a reasonably secure system, the project team will have moved on, their budget will have gone with them, and you’ll be left filling out that risk assessment that sits on some executive’s desk waiting for the risk to be accepted. Tick.

But on the flip-side, if you’re not proactively engaging with project teams and your business to provide solutions for them, you’re getting in the way.

Let’s face it, no project manager wants to read through dozens of pages of security policy and discern the requirements for their project — you may as well have told them through interpretive dance.

So, what’s the solution?

The solution is to look to the mature field of IT Service Management, and the concept of having a Service Catalogue.

A Security Services Catalogue is two things:

Firstly, it is a list of the security and assurance activities which the security team offers which are generally party of the system development lifecycle. These services may include a risk assessment, vulnerability assessment and penetration testing, and code review, among others. The important thing being that the services are well defined in terms of the offering inputs, outputs and process, and the required effort and price, so that the business and the project teams can effectively incorporate it into their budget and schedule.

Secondly, it is a list of the security services already implemented within the organisation and operated by or on behalf of the security team, which have been through your assurance processes and are effectively “approved for use” throughout the organisation. These services would be the implementation of a secure design pattern or blueprint, or form part of one of those blueprints. To get an idea, have a look at the OSA Security Architecture Landscape, or the Mozilla Service Catalog.

Referring quickly to Mozilla’s approach, a good example is their logging or monitoring or SIEM service. Assuming a regulatory and policy requirement for logging and monitoring for all systems throughout your environment, it allows the project team to save money and time by using the standardised service. Of course, using the already implemented tool is also common sense, but writing it down in a catalogue ensures that the security services on offer are communicated to the business, and that the logging and monitoring function for your new system is a known-quantity and effective.

The easiest way to describe this approach is “control inheritance” — where a particular implementation of a control is used by a system, that system inherits the characteristics of that control. Think of Active Directory — an access control mechanism. Once you’ve implemented and configured it securely, and it has been evaluated, you have a level of assurance that the control is effective. For all systems then using Active Directory, you have a reasonable level of assurance that they are access controlled, and you can spend your time evaluating other security aspects of the system. So communicate to your organisation that they can use it via your Security Service Catalogue.

And if your Project team wants to get creative? No problem, but anything not in the catalogue needs to go through your full assurance process. That — quite rightly — means risk assessments, control audits, code reviews, penetration tests, and vulnerability scans, which accurately reflects the fact that everything will be much easier for everyone if they pick from the catalogue where possible.

So, how does this work in practice?

Well, firstly, start by defining what level of assurance you need for a system to go into production, or to meet compliance. For example, should you need to meet PCI compliance, you’ll at least have to get your system vulnerability scanned and penetration tested. Create your service catalogue around these, and defining business rules for their use and the system development lifecycle stages in which they must be completed.

Secondly, you need to break down your environment into its constituent parts (specifically the security components), review and approve each of those parts, and add them to your Security Service Catalogue. Any system then using those security services as part of its functionality, inherits the security of those services, and you can have a degree of assurance that the system will be secure (at least to the degree that the system is solely comprised of approved components).

The benefits are fourfold:
Project teams can simply select the services they want to integrate with, and know that those services meet the requirements of the security policy. No mess, no fuss.
Projects go faster, project teams know what the expectations are for them, and aren’t held up by the security inquisitor demanding their resources’ time.
Budget predictability. Project teams know the costs which need to be included in their budget up front. They can also choose a security service which is a known-quantity, which means there is a lower chance of a risk eventuating that needs them to pay to change aspects of the system to meet compliance or remediate a vulnerability.

You don’t need to check the security of the re-used components used by those projects over and over again.
For example, you might use an on-premise Active Directory instance with which identity and access management is performed; or maybe it’s hosted in Azure. Perhaps you use Okta, a cloud based SaaS Identity and Access Control service. For logging and monitoring, you might use Splunk or AlienVault as your organisation-wide security monitoring service, or maybe you outsource it to AlertLogic. Whatever. Perform your due diligence, and add it to your catalogue.

Once it’s in your catalogue, you should assess it annually, as part of your business as usual security practices — firstly for risk, secondly at a technical level to validate your risk findings, and finally in a market context to see if there are better controls now available to address the same risk issue.

I’ve been part of a small team building a security certification and accreditation program from scratch, and have seen that the only way to scale the certification process, and ensure sufficient depth of security review across the multitude of systems present in most organisations, is to make sure unnecessary re-hashing of solution reviews is minimised, using these “control inheritance” principles.

Thirdly, develop a Security Requirements Document (SRD) template based upon your Security Services Catalogue. This is where you define the services available and requirements for your project teams, and make the choices really easy for them. Either use the services in the security services catalogue, or comply with all the requirements of the Password Policy, Access Control Policy, Encryption Policy, etc. After a time, your Project Lifecycle will mature, your Security Services will become more standardised and robust, and your life will become significantly easier.

Lastly, get involved with your project teams. Your project teams are not security experts, you are. And the sooner you make it easy for them to get what resources and expertise you have available, the sooner they can make the best decisions for your organisation, the more secure your organisation will be. Make the secure way the easy way, and everyone’s life will be a little more comfortable.


Article by Ben Waters, Senior Security Advisor, Hivint

About the Author

Leave a Reply